HISTORY


The Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Ojibwe reside on and near a 32.35 acre reservation in Aitkin County, Minnesota. The reservation lies nestled in the southern part of the famous Arrowhead country; a region of fish-filled lakes, of deep valleys, and of rugged pine and hardwood covered hills.

The reservation is located approximately one hundred and twenty-five miles north of the Twin Cities and sixty miles west of Duluth, near the town of McGregor, Minnesota.

Sandy Lake Band's history as an Indian Group can be traced back to the 1730s, when westward Ojibwe expansion reached beyond the Great Lakes to the Sandy Lake area of what is now Aitkin County in Minnesota.

The Sandy Lakers played a vital role in establishing a permanent Ojibwe presence in the north-central Minnesota region.

The Sandy Lake Band strategically made its home on the historic Mississippi water route - rich in wild rice and game - and the legendary Savanna Portage, which linked the Mississippi and Great Lakes drainage systems. This important transportation network hosted the exploratory travels of notables like David Thompson, Zebulon Pike, Lewis Cass, and Henry Rowe Schoolcraft, to name a few, who all wrote about the Sandy Lake Ojibwe.

Traders and government officials did business with the Sandy Lakers; and missionary activity at Sandy Lake went on for decades. In fact, the first school in what is now Minnesota was established at Sandy Lake by Rev. Frederick Ayer and his wife in 1831. Prominent missionaries like Ely, Hall, Pierz, Spates, and Whipple speak of the Sandy Lake Band in their correspondences and memoirs. The British Northwest Company and the American Fur Company established posts there in 1794 and 1826 respectively.

Chiefs and headmen of the Sandy Lake Band figured prominently in Ojibwe history. Grosse Guelle, a Sandy Laker, was among the Chippewa who addressed the 1825 treaty conference which included Chippewa, Sioux, and U.S. Government officials at work on the Chippewa-Sioux boundary line, Ka-ta-wah-be-dah (Broken Tooth), Kroseweezais-hish (Curly Hair), Hole-in-the-Day I, We-we-shan-shis (Bad Boy), and Ka-nan-da-wa-win-zo (Le Brocheux), were a few of the Sandy Lake leaders during a long period in the 18th and 19th centuries when Sandy Lake was the most prominent power base for the Chippewa. In 1864, Chief Hole-in-the-Day II (younger) represented the Chippewas of the Mississippi in treaty negotiations.

Sandy Lake Band prominence, as a people and as an Ojibwe leadership capitol, are treated at length by historians, from the Ojibwe writer, William Whipple Warren(History of the Ojibway People) to William Watts Folwell, scholar and first president of the University of Minnesota(A History of Minnesota, 4 vols.); from N.H. Winchell's TheAborigines of Minnesota (1911)to
ethnohistorian Harold Hickerson's Ethnohistory of Mississippi Bands and Pillager and Winnibigoshish Bands of Chippewa. (1974).

Scores of academic works in the areas of history, ethnohistory, and archaeology detail the Sandy Lake Band record. In his book, Minnesota's Chippewa Treaty of 1837 (Brainerd, Minn,: Historic Heartland Association, 1993), Historian Carl Zapffe observed correctly that for many years "Sandy Lake was to the Ojibwe people what Washington D.C., is to the United States today."

Indian agency and subagency records from places like St. Peters (Fort Snelling), Fond du Lac, La Pointe, St. Louis, Crow Wing, and Sandy Lake- plus the correspondences of agents and other government personnel, refer specifically to the Sandy Lake Band and help detail its ongoing condition, its relations with the U.S. government, and its continuing existence as an autonomous Indian group.

The Annual Reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs contain considerable information about the Sandy Lake Band, including descriptions of the Band (example: Alexander Ramsey's Smith's report on how attempts to remove the Sandy Lakers in the late 1860s were "a farce", and how despite government efforts, the Sandy Lake people "with few exceptions, returned to their old haunts". (Annual Report, Commissioner of Indian Affairs, For the year 1872, p. 208.) Records of annuity payments and census reports of Chippewas of the Mississippi include the Sandy Lake Band as a separate Indian group.

The Sandy Lake Chiefs and Headsmen were signatories to ten (10) treaties with the United States beginning in 1825 and ending in 1867 during the 1871 treaty-making period. The original Sandy Lake Indian Reservation, was created by the Treaty of Feb. 22, 1855 (10 Stat., 1165), included all of what is now called Big Sandy Lake and a surrounding land area. The reserved tract at Sandy Lake is specifically described in the treaty document.





HISTORICAL TIMELINE

Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa


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1730s

First Ojibwe group to establish a power base west of the Mississippi River.

1794

Establishment of British Northwest Company trading post at Sandy Lake.

1825

Treaty of Prairie du Chien with the Sioux in the territory of Michigan on August 19, 1825.

1826

American Fur Company post built at Sandy Lake.

1826

Treaty with the Chippewa concluded at the Fond du Lac of Lake Superior on August 5, 1826.

1831

Mission school established at Sandy Lake by Frederick Ayer and wife, the first school in what is now the State of Minnesota.

1837

Treaty with the Chippewa at St. Peters (the confluence of the St. Peters and Mississippi rivers) in the territory of Wisconsin on July 29, 1837.

1842

Treaty with the Chippewa at LaPointe of Lake Superior in the territory of Wisconsin on October 4, 1842.

1847

Treaty with the Chippewa of the Mississippi and Lake Superior made and concluded at the Fond du Lac of Lake Superior on August 2, 1847.

1850

U.S. Indian Department established a subagency at Sandy Lake.

1854

Treaty with the Chippewa made and concluded at LaPointe, in the State of Wisconsin on September 30, 1854.

1855

Treaty with the Chippewa made and concluded at the City of Washington, D.C. on February 22, 1855.

1864

Treaty with the Chippewa, Mississippi, and Pillager and Lake Winnigigoshish Bands (1864) made and concluded at the City of Washington, D.C. On May 7, 1864 (Treaty is similar to the treaty of 1863, only addition was the tribe residing on the Sandy Lake Reservation shall not be removed).

1866

Northwest Indian Commission came to meet with the Sandy Lake Ojibwe.

1867

Treaty with the Chippewa of the Mississippi, 1867, made and concluded at Washington D.C. on March 19, 1867.

1886

Northwest Indian Commission came to meet with the Sandy Lake Ojibwe.

1889

U.S. Indian Commission travelled to Sandy Lake and Kimberly, Minnesota to hold five councils with the Sandy Lake Band of Ojibwe.

1915

32.35 acre Sandy Lake Indian Reservation established on Sandy Lake by Executive Order No. 2144 of President Woodrow Wilson upon recommendation of the Interior Secretary.

1940

147-acre Sandy Lake Indian Reservation was established via purchase by the Interior Department from the fund"Acquisition of Land for Indian Tribes".

1954

June 14, 1954, Sandy Lake Local Council, Chaired by George Skinaway, to sell timber on the reservation in order to repair community pump at Sandy Lake.

1979

Clifford Skinaway Sr., descendant of of the Chief's Hole-in-the-Day of the Mississippi and recognized as Chief Hole-in-the-day VII, by other potential heirs to the title and further recognized as such by members of his community and officials of the State of Minnesota, began study and work towards efforts to restore the federal recognition of the historic Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Ojibwe.

1980

May 29, 1980, Elmer Nitzschke, Field Solicitor for the Department of the Interior, Office of the Field Solicitor, Twin Cities, Minnesota Office, rendered an opinion without citing to any relevant authority proclaimed "that the Executive Order No. 2144 established a reservation at Sandy Lake and that the Mille Lacs Reservation Business Committee is empowered to exercise control over the reservation."

The opinion did not address the question of the status of the Sandy Lake Band's federal recognition. It was not an "M-Opinion" which would have been binding on the Secretary of the Interior. Moreover, even if the opinion had been an M-Opinion, the opinion would not have been sufficient to affect the Sandy Lake Band's federal recognition status. Only an act of the United States Congress could have taken away the Sandy Lake Band's recognition by the federal government.

The loss of federal recognition of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa resulted from an erroneous legal opinion by a field solicitor.

1991

In August, Hereditary Chief Clifford Skinaway, on behalf of the Sandy Lake Band, presented a petition to the Bureau of Indian Affairs to request a secretarial election to adopt or deny the application of the Indian Reorganization Act to the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Ojibwe pursuant to the provision of the Wheeler-Howard Action (IRA) of 1934.
The petition was denied by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

1991

Hereditary Chief Clifford Skinaway, on behalf of the Sandy Lake Band initiates a federal court action against the Secretary of the Interior, Bureau of Indian Arffairs. The court case was later dismissed without prejudice because the Sandy Lake Band is required to exhaust all administrative remedies. The administrative process is less than certain because it is questionable as to whether the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Ojibwe even has a standing to bring an action under the Bureau of Indian Affairs administrative process which is designed to help petitioners who "are not currently acknowledged as an Indian tribe".

1992

On March 10, 1992, at the request of Hereditary Chief, Clifford Skinaway, the Aitkin County Board of Commissioners passed a resolution in support of the Sandy Lake Band as a governmental entity to be federally restored as a tribe in a reservation, separate and apart from all other Ojibwe bands in Minnesota.

1994

On July 5, 1994, Hereditary Chief Clifford Skinaway Sr., passed away. Due to extreme political pressures of the Mille Lacs Band and the Minnesota Chippewa Tribes, he was unable to achieve the federal re-recognition of his tribe in his lifetime. Today, his family and the Sandy Lake Band members pledge their commitment to continue his efforts.

1995

On July 5, 1995, Sandy Lake Ojibwe and Dakota descendants attend "Healing of Nations Gathering" at Lac du Flambeau against Colorado developer's plans to build homes on Strawberry Island, burial site of a Chippewa-Dakota battle site.

1996

On November 26, 1996 the Aitkin County board of Commissioners passed a second resolution supporting the Sandy Lake Band as a governmental entity to be established as a tribe in a reservation, separate and apart from all other Ojibwe Bands in Minnesota.

1997

S.F. No. 1098 A bill for an act; relating to Indians, was introduced in the Minnesota State Legislature on March 6, 1997, recognizing the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa as a state recognized Indian tribe.

H.F. 2208, A bill for an act; relating to Indians, was introduced in the Minnesota State Legislature by Representative Irv Anderson on May 13, 1997, recognizing the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa as a state recognized Indian tribe.

Due to budget issues and the end of the legislative session, our legislation was tabled until the next legislative session, where it was never brought up again.

1999

H.F. 2382, A bill for an act; relating to Indians, was re-introduced by Representative Irv Anderson on April 12, 1999, recognizing the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa as a state recognized Indian tribe.

H.F. 2382 had a first reading in the Governmental Operations and Veterans Affairs Policy Committee on April 12, 1999 and a second reading and Committee Report passed on March 2, 2000. H.F. 2382 was sent to the General Register of bills for a full house vote.

2000

S.F. 3703, A bill for an act; relating to Indians, was re-introduced by Senator Bob Lessard on March 2, 2000, recognizing the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa as a state recognized Indian tribe.

S.F. 3703 had a first reading and was referred to the Governmental Operations and Veterans Committee on March 02, 2000. The Committee reported to pass on March 09, 2000.

Senator Roger Moe, influenced by the opposing Minnesota Tribes, under Rule 35 referred our state recognition bill to his Rules and Administration Committee where it was left to languish.

While state recognition would largely be symbolic,
it would help honor and preserve the history and identity
of the historic Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa.

2000

On December 2, 2000, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Ojibwe
gathered with members of the Lake Superior Chippewa to commemorate
the 150th anniversary of the Sandy Lake Tragedy in Minnesota when
hundreds of Lake Superior Chippewa died from illness, hunger and
exposure in the winter of 1850.

2001

On July 26, 2001, members of the Sandy Lake Band attended the
Sandy Lake Memorial Dedication Ceremony. The descendants of the
1850 annuity bands gathered to dedicate a memorial to those Ojibwe
who suffered and died in 1850. The memorial stands as a tribute.

On September 13, 2001, The Lac Vieux Desert Tribal Council 
adopted a resolution in support of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi
Chippewa in their efforts to restore federal recognition to their tribe.

2002

On October 4, 2002, members of the Sandy Lake Band attend the
Annual Sandy Lake Memorial Ceremony to commemorate the
anniversary of the Sandy Lake Tragedy of 1850.

2003

On September 19, 2003, members of the Sandy Lake Band attended
the annual Sandy Lake Tragedy Memorial ceremony to commemorate the
anniversary of the Sandy Lake Tragedy of 1850.

2004

Members of the Sandy Lake Band attend the Annual Sandy Lake
Tragedy Memorial Ceremony to commemorate the anniversary of the
Sandy Lake Tragedy of 1850.

2007

On April 10, 2007, Representatives of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa met with the Red Lake Band of Chippewa Tribal
Council to seek their support for the Sandy Lake Band's efforts to
restore federal recognition to our tribe. After our presentation, the Red
Lake Tribal Council chose not to support Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi
Chippewa in their efforts.

On July 25, 2007, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi
Chippewa attended the annual Sandy Lake Tragedy Mikwendaagoziwag
Ceremonies to honor the victims of the 1850 Sandy Lake tragedy
hosted by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission
(GLIFWC). Sandy Lake tribal members participated in the "paddle"
across Big Sandy Lake. The annual ceremony was held at the
Mikwendaagooziwag Memorial at the US Army Corps of Engineers
recreational site north of McGregor, Minnesota.

2009

On October 1, 2009, members of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa attended the annual Sandy Lake Ceremonies to
honor the victims of the 1850 Sandy Lake tragedy hosted by GLIFWC.
Two tribal members participated in the "paddle" across Big Sandy Lake.
The annual ceremony was held at the Mikwendagooziwag Memorial at the
US Army Corps of Engineers recreational site north of McGregor,
Minnesota.

2010

On May 14, 2010, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa attended the 1855 Treaty forum held at Diamond Point park in Bemidji, Minnesota. Tribal representatives from the Leech Lake and White Earth reservations hosted the collaborative public forum to educate the greater public about the 1855 Treaty reserved and inherent treaty rights.

On August 4, 2010, as in previous years, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa attended the Annual Sandy Lake Memorial Ceremony to commemorate the anniversary of the Sandy Lake Tragedy of 1850.

September 1, 2010, the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi
Chippewa filed a law suit against the Bureau of Indian Affairs to restore
their tribal federal recognition status.

On September 30, 2010, a few members of the tribal council of the
Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa were invited to a meeting at the
Palisade school in Palisade, Minnesota regarding the garbage and
hazardous waste processing facility being proposed in the shore land
zone of the Mississippi River in Palisade. The Sandy Lake Band is
opposed to this facility due to the environmental impact of the proposed
gasification project. It has the potential to contaminate the air, soil,
water,the wild rice beds and the wildlife. It is also not far from the Sandy
Lake Indian Reservation.

2011

On May 14, 2011, representatives of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa participated in a rally during the Governor's fishing
opener in Grand Rapids, Minnesota, in solidarity with the "Protect Our
Manoomin" group that hosted this rally to create awareness of the wild rice
sulfate standard.  Governor Dayton chose not to meet with the Protect Our
Manoomin group to talk about maintaining the wild rice sulfate standard
legislation.

July 1, 2011, United States District Judge Donovan W. Frank granted the defendant's motion to dismiss. The case was dismissed WITHOUT PREJUDICE which would allow the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa to file another lawsuit against the United States Government. 
Case is now referred to as Sandy Lake 1

July 27, 2011, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa attended the annual Sandy Lake Tragedy Mikwendaagoziwag Ceremonies to honor the victims of the 1850 Sandy Lake tragedy sponsored by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC). Sandy Lake tribal members participated in the "paddle"across Big Sandy Lake. The annual ceremony was held at the Mikwendaagooziwag Memorial at the US Army Corps of Engineers recreational site north of McGregor, Minnesota.

August 13, 2011, the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa participated in the 50th Birthday celebration of the Savanna Portage State Park.
Tribal members conducted wild rice and maple syrup demonstrations.

September 28, 2011, the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa filed the second Complaint for Declaratory and Injunctive Relief against the United States of America; Ken Salazar, as Secretary of the Interior; Larry Echo Hawk, as the Assistant Secretary for Indian Affairs.

December 13, 2011, Chairwoman Sandra Skinaway of the Sandy Lake
Band of Mississippi Chippewa, provided a statement to the St. Louis County Board of Commissioners on behalf of Protect Our Manoomin (POM), in testimony, against a resolution in support of Minnesota's first copper mine. This would be the first of what is expected to be several copper-nickel precious metals mine projects proposed from Aitkin County to Ely, Minnesota. Protect our Manoomin is an Anishinaabe grassroots organization that works to educate our people on reservations about the dangers of non-ferrous mining and it's effects on our manoomin. Due to strong opposition of copper mining from many concerned citizens in Duluth, the resolution was withdrawn and will be resubmitted on December 20, 2011 in Ely, MN where the resolution author believed the resolution would pass with full support of the Iron Range citizens. Many people and a few commissioners believed that the county was acting too quickly before a full environmental review process was finished and before the state and federal agencies could determine if a copper mine could be built without causing serious>environmental harm.

2012

On February 10, 2012, the hearings on the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa's Motion for Partial Summary Judgment and also the United States Motion to Dismiss, or in the Alternative., Motion for Summary Judgment, were heard before the Honorable Donovan W. Frank, United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, in St. Paul. Federal Judge, Donovan Frank will issue his opinion within sixty days.

March 8, 2012 - Representatives of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa participated in a rally at the state Capitol in support of Frank Moe and his sled dog team who had ran 360 miles from Grand Marais, Minnesota to the state Capitol in St. Paul to raise awareness of the danger of sulfide mining pollution in Minnesota. The sled dog trek also carried petitions containing 13,000 signatures from concerned Minnesotans who oppose nonferrous (sulfide) mining adjacent to the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness, which would ultimately affect the whole state of Minnesota.

March 14, 2012 - Sandra Skinaway, Chairwoman of the Sandy Lake
Band of Mississippi Chippewa provided testimony during the hearing of
the Minnesota Senate State Government Innovation and Veterans
Committee, opposing the Minnesota Legislature's legislation to establish
wolf hunting and trapping seasons in Minnesota. Chairwoman Sandra
Skinaway wanted to place on public record that the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa is OPPOSED to the public hunting and killing of
the wolf. The wolf holds a special and sacred place in the Anishinaabe
culture and that we have a duty to try our best to protect the wolf and
speak for them since they don't have a voice.

May 4, 2012 - For the second time, Federal Judge Donovan Frank
dismissed WITH PREJUDICE, the Sandy Lake Band's second Complaint for
 Declaratory and Injunctive relief against the United States of America; Ken Salazar, as Secretary of the Interior; Larry Echo Hawk, as the Assistant
Secretary for Indian Affairs. The Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa
will appeal this decision to the 8th Circuit Court of Appeals.
Case is now referred to as Sandy Lake 11.

June 22, 2012 - Representatives of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa provided a feast and lecture to the students and
staff of the Nandagikendan Academy of the Fond du Lac Tribal and
Community College. The lecture and presentation was on the 1850 Sandy
Lake Tragedy & Mikwendaagoziwag Memorial located at the U.S. Army
Corp of Engineers Sandy Lake Recreational Campground in McGregor,
MN.

July 5, 2012, the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa filed the notice of Appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit from the final judgment filed on May 7th, 2012. The Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa hopes to have an unbiased, fair, and equitable decision from this.

On July 25, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Miississippi Chippewa attended the annual Sandy Lake Tragedy Mkwendaagozwag Ceremonies to honor and remember the Anishinaabe victims of the 1850 Sandy Lake Tragedy sponsored by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission (GLIFWC).

The annual ceremony was held at the Miikwendaagoziwag Memorial at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers recreational site north of McGregor, Minnesota.

August 9, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa participated in a rally sponsored by a non- profit group called "Howling for Wolves" against the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources sanctioned Wolf Sport Hunt scheduled to coincide with the 2012 Deer hunting season. In the Anishinaabe creation story, the wolf is our brother and whatever happens to the wolf will happen to the Anishinaabe people. The wolf is a political pawn to the state of Minnesota.
The Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi chippewa has declared all Sandy Lake Indian Reservation lands as a sanctuary for the wolf and is off limits to wolf hunting.

On September 7, 2012 members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa sponsored a rally in downtown Duluth in an effort to inform the public about our opposition to the upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport Hunting and Trapping of the Wolf in Minnesota.

Dr. Maureen Hackett of Howling for Wolves also attended from the Twin
Cities. It was a call to the public to call Governor Dayton and the DNR
Commissioner Tom Landwehr to stop the Wolf Sport Hunt.

On September 15, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa participated in the 2nd rally in downtown Duluth in 
opposition to the upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport Hunting and Trapping of the Wolf in Minnesota.  The wolf is a part of our culture and heritage.

On September 22, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa participated in the 3rd rally in downtown Duluth in 
opposition to the upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport Hunting and Trapping of
the Wolf in Minnesota.

On September 28, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa participated in the 4th rally in downtown Duluth in 
opposition to the upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport Hunting and Trapping
Season starting November 3, 2012. The Wolf is a part of our culture and
heritage.

On October 5, 2012, motion for extension of time to file brief is filed by Mr. Scott Johnson for Appellant Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa. Motion granted for extension of time to file brief and to file the opposition for leave to proceed as amicus curiae filed by the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe as an interested party.

On October 6, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi
Chippewa participated in the 5th rally in downtown Duluth in another effort
to inform the public about the upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport Hunting and
Trapping of the Wolf in Minnesota.

On October 13, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa participated in the 6th "Stop the Wolf Hunt" rally in
downtown Duluth in another effort to inform the public about the 
upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport Hunting and Trapping of the Wolf in
Minnesota.

On October 20, 2012, many members of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa attended "WOLF WALK 2012" in downtown Duluth.
Sandra Skinaway, Chairwoman of the Sandy Lake Band also co-founded
the "Northwoods Wolf Alliance".  The "Wolf Walk" and rally urged people to
contact Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton and DNR Commissioner, Tom
Landwehr to stop the Wolf Sport Hunting and Trapping Season scheduled
to begin November 3, 2012. The event concluded with a historic Walk
through Downtown Duluth. The wolf is part of our culture and heritage and
is a part of our creation story. Many feel that the wolf has barely begun to
recover from the brink of extinction.

October 27, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of
Mississippi Chippewa participated in the 8th Stop the Wolf Hunt rally in
downtown Duluth in opposition to the upcoming 2012 DNR Wolf Sport
Hunting and Trapping of the Wolf in Minnesota.

November 3, 2012, members of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi
Chippewa will be in travel status attending various "Honoring Ma'iingan"
events during the opening of the 2012 DNR Sport Hunting and
Trapping Season.

2013

May 20, 2013, Because the district court had adjudicated the issue of subject matter jurisdication and the Sandy Lake Band did not appeal from that decision, the appeals court is bound by the district court's original determination that it lacked subject matter jurisdiction. The district court's dismissal order is AFFIRMED, but modified to be WITHOUT PREJUDICE.

The Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa will continue efforts to
restore their federal recognition status.

July 31, 2013, members of the Sandy Lake Band attended the annual Sandy Lake Tragedy Memorial ceremony to commemorate the anniversary of the Sandy Lake Tragedy of 1850.

2014

January 28, 2014, Chairwoman Sandra Skinaway testified on behalf of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa before the Minnesota
House Environment & Natural Resources Policy Committee on their
Informational Hearing on Wolf Management.  The Wolf is vital to our culture and heritage as Ojibwe people.

February 27, 2014, Chairwoman Sandra Skinaway, on behalf of the Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa, participated at a "Wolf Day" event at the Minnesota state Capitol.  About 400 Minnesota constituents rallied against the recreational wolf hunting and trapping seasons in this event sponsored by the wolf advocate organization, Howling for Wolves.

July 17, 2014, Representatives of the Sandy Lake Ojibwe traveled to the Menominee Reservation in Keshena, WI to attend and provide comments to the Department of the Interior's Office of the Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs Public Meeting.  The Interior Proposes a Reform of Federal Ackknowledgment Regulations.

 July 23, 2014, Sandy Lake Ojibwe join and particpate in the "Paddle Against the Sandpiper" event sponsored by the Native led organization, Honor the Earth.  Informational meeting about the Enbridge Proposed Sandpiper pipeline route through our homelands and our wildrice beds.  A paddle on Big Sandy Lake was held after the meeting at the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers Recreation Area just north of McGregor, MN.

July 30, 2014, Sandy Lake Ojibwe members attend and participate in the
annual Sandy Lake Tragedy "Mikwendaagoziwag" Memorial Ceremony and
paddle sponsored by the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission
(GLIFWC) to commemorate the anniversary of the Sandy Lake Tragedy of
1850 where 400 Lake Superior Ojibwe died due to the attempted removal of the Wisconsin Ojibwe to Minnesota by the US Government.

July 31, 2014, Representatives of the Sandy Lake Ojibwe participate in
a second Honor the Earth event.  A rally and paddle in Brainerd, MN on the
Mississippi River.  It's purpose is to show our opposition to the proposed
route of the Enbridge Sandpiper Oil Pipeline of which snakes through the
watersheds, Lakes, Rivers, and our life sustaining Wildrice beds.

August 7, 2014, Chairwoman Sandra Skinaway attends the Honor the Earth rally outside the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission building in St. Paul, MN to share information about the Enbridge Sandpiper pipeline
route and to voice opposition to the route on the Sandy Lake Ojibwe's homelands.

August 9, 2014, Chairwoman Sandra Skinaway attends a "Stop the Wolf Hunt" rally in downtown Duluth, MN.  Minnesota plans to kill thirty more wolves in the next recreational 2014 Wolf hunting and trapping season.  Why kill wolves?  It's not for sustenance purposes but for trophies and for sport.  Wolves are a vital part of the Ojibwe culture and are a clan animal.

August 18, 2014, Sandy Lake Ojibwe attends the Honor the Earth's " Horse Ride for Mother Earth and the Love Water Not Oil Tour" with the East Lake Indian Community in response to the threat of an oil pipeline going through the waters and the wildrice lakes and rivers of the Ojibwe homelands across the state of Minnesota.

 August 20, 2014, Chairwoman Sandra Skinaway, representing the
Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Ojibwe, attends the regular meeting of
the 1855 Treaty Authority at the Black Bear Casino Resort on the Fond du
Lac Indian Reservation.

 

 

 




Sandy Lake Band of Mississippi Chippewa